Love Literacy – The Very Hungry Caterpillar

The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle celebrates it’s 45th anniversary this year. The book was originally published on 3rd June 1969 and 45 years later it is still a favourite with children around the world.

So In celebration of this incredible book I decided to go on search of some Very Hungry Caterpillar activities and here are a few.

This activity is one of my favourites that I have found, if you love using props to bring stories to life try this Very Hungry Caterpillar sock puppet .

Here is another caterpillar prop that can be used during the story, as well as for counting and fine motor skills.

If your looking for something to improve critical thinking why not try a Very Hungry Caterpillar puzzle. This activity can be used in a variety of ways, you can start it as a mark making activity and as well as being a puzzle you put together you can use it to talk about shapes and colour as well as using it as a counting activity. If you want a little less prep time use paper plates.

If your looking for some more mark making activities, here are two painting activities for making some caterpillars, cup painting and balloon painting.

And last but not least here is a page that I found on Facebook called toddler approved and it’s full of fun activities including 25 Very Hungry Caterpillar activities .

I hope you find something on this post to help you to celebrate one of my all time favourite books in your settings but if not how about a live butterfly garden. They aren’t expensive and you can buy them quite easily online. You get a small container with 5 caterpillars in and it contains all the food they’ll need before they make their chrysalis better known as a cocoon.The container has a window on so the children can see everything going on inside. Once they have attached themselves in their cocoons to the lid of the container, you take the lid off and attach it to the inside of the butterfly garden (which is actually a large cylinder net) with the safety pins provided. The children can seem the transformation take place and eventually the caterpillars come out of their cocoons as beautiful butterfly, you can feed them fruit for a few days and then the children can help to set them free. It is fascinating for the children to watch and setting them free can be an adventure in itself, whether you set them free or go to your local park or local woods.

A nice little song to go with this is

Incy wincy caterpillar(in the tune of Incy wincy spider)

Incy wincy caterpillar crawling on a leaf
Spun a little chrysalis and then he went to sleep
While he was asleep he dreamt that he could fly
and when he woke up he was a butterfly.

If your looking for more books about butterflies and caterpillars, one of my current favours is Monkey Puzzle by Julia Donaldson. Monkey Puzzle is a fantastic book that is about a little monkey who has lost his mum and dad and a butterfly helps him to find them. The confusion begins because the butterfly doesn’t realise the monkeys mum and dad look like him because as she later says ‘none of my babies look like me’, her babies still being caterpillars. It is a lovely book that you can use to talk about caterpillars and their transform to being butterflies. You could also use it to talk about diversity and families and communities such as ‘do you look your mum or dad?’, this could include a mark making activities such family portraits or self portraits. You can also you can use it to learn about rhyming words, as you can do with a lot of Julia Donaldson books.

What was your favourite book as a child?

Love Early Education
Love, Kylie x

Love Sharing – Sharing Sunday

I have been so busy this week with an exciting trip to York and working on my assignment that I haven’t had a chance to update my wordpress page but I have been sharing on Facebook and twitter, so I have decided to do a ‘Sharing Sunday’ and share all the activities, news and pages I have shared on my Facebook this week. This may become a regular feature along side my Quote of the Week, which I will do by the end of tonight :)

So here we go, Sharing Sunday…

This social experiment called ‘The Kidnapping Children Experiment’ was filmed by Yousef Saleh Erakat who runs fouseyTUBE. It is shocking and scary but really makes you think, how would you react? As it says in the footage 30 seconds of bravery could save a childs life.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2556400/He-tried-car-Shocking-video-shows-people-really-respond-attempted-child-abductions.html

Here are a few links from a new page I’ve been following on Facebook, The Natural Parent Magazine…

What an awesome idea…

I absolutely love this, it is so true…

Thinking I must still be in that amazing state of life that is childhood…

And finally one from Simple Homeschool, which is a lovely little literacy quote…

Hope you like these as much as I did.

Love Early Education

Love, Kylie x

Love Literacy – The Stick Man by Julia Donaldson

I have just seen the on Facebook and I love this idea! I think it would be great to do along side reading The Stick Man by Julia Donaldson (if you’ve not read it, read it as soon as you can another fantastic read from Julia.) You could bring the story to life by making the stick man and his family.

http://www.danyabanya.com/2014/02/stick-people.html

Love Early Education
Love, Kylie x

Love Science – Stinky potions

This week I have been so busy I haven’t had a chance to share any Valentines Day activities. Since Valentines Day has been and gone for this year, I’m going share one that we did for Valentines Day in my setting but it’s a great one you can do all year round :)

I discovered this activity on Pinterest as a Valentines Day activity for making love potions:

http://www.notimeforflashcards.com/2013/01/love-potions-valentines-day-science-play.html#comment-309142

I absolutely loved the idea and decided to do it with my preschoolers. We ordered White Vinegar and bicarbonate of soda for the activity but Malt vinegar was delivered instead and we ended up making what the children called stinky potions instead. The potions were obviously darker in colour and smelled really strong but the children loved it. Once they got over the initial excitement of seeming the expanding foam pour out of the containers they asked if we could make big potion and they started to add things like toy bugs, one of them even asked did we have any toy eyes to make a scary potion.

It was fantastic we got to do some counting and measuring of the ingredients and we used fine and gross motor skills picking up the jugs and using them to pour and fill the jugs and containers. Also the language the children used and developed was brilliant, talking about how it smelled and how it felt, eventually the children came up with the title of stinky potions.

I will definitely be recreating this for Halloween.

Love Early Education
Love, Kylie x